Women Warriors In: NASA

Many of you might have heard about the new movie called Hidden Figures. The movie is a biographical film based in the late 60’s about three African-American women working in the segregated Computers division at NASA. They who helped NASA catch up in the Space Race allowing for the American astronaut to make a complete orbit of the Earth.

The movie brings to light the women who have been hidden in the side lines but have been a crucial part of many successes at NASA. There are various other women who almost no one really knows about who have been critical to NASA’s successes.

I recently got the chance to visit the NASA Space Center in Houston Texas and decided to find out more about the women of NASA!

  Me between parts of the Saturn V Rocket which was used in the 1960’s and 70’s to launch people to the moon.

Me between parts of the Saturn V Rocket which was used in the 1960’s and 70’s to launch people to the moon.


Here are 3 of the many very important women who have worked for NASA and have made exceptional accomplishments for NASA, themselves, and for all women.

Katherine Johnson, also known as “the girl who loved to count”, is an American physicist and mathematician. She made fundamental contributions to the US’s aeronautics and space programs with the application of digital electronic computers to NASA.

She worked on the 1969 Apollo 11 flight to the Moon, which is portrayed in the movie Hidden Figures. She was honored with the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Barack Obama in 2015.

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Margaret Hamilton worked as a computer scientist and systems engineer. She directed the Software Engineering Division which developed flight software for the Apollo Space program.

She was recently honored with the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Barak Obama for her developments for NASA’s Apollo Moon Missions.

 

 

 

 

 

Mae C. Jemison was the first African-American female astronaut. She flew into space aboard the Endeavor in 1992, becoming the first African-American woman in space.

Jemison noted that society should recognize how much both women and members of other minority groups can contribute if given the opportunity.

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 Fun Fact: Jemison stared on Star Trek: The Next Generation!

Fun Fact: Jemison stared on Star Trek: The Next Generation!

It has been a rough journey for women to integrate themselves into a male-dominant society since the beginning. Thanks to these women, and other women alike, we have been able to see the journey and progression of women finally getting to shine in the limelight and be aknowledged for their great accomplishments.